The Medicinal Herb Info site was created to help educate visitors about the often forgotten wisdom of the old ways of treating illnesses. Many of today's drugs and medicines were originally derived from natural ingredients, combinations of plants and other items found in nature.

We are not suggesting that you ignore the help of trained medical professionals, simply that you have additional options available for treating illnesses. Often the most effective treatment involves a responsible blend of both modern and traditional treatments.

We wish you peace and health!

Translate:

Hedge Hyssop

Scientific Names

Hedge Hyssop

  • Gratiola officinalis L.
  • Figwort family

Parts Usually Used

The entire plant
Back to Top


Description of Plant(s) and Culture

Hedge hyssop is a European perennial herb; grows to a height of about 1 foot. The branched, hollow, quadrangular stem grows from a thin, creeping rootstock and bears opposite, sessile, lanceolate, shallow-toothed leaves. The solitary, axillary flowers have a tubular corolla that is rose-colored or reddish with yellow streaks. Blooms June to August.
Other varieties: related American species are annuals and have flowers whose corollas have yellow tubes and white lips.

Back to Top


Where Found

Found in low, wet places.
Back to Top


Medicinal Properties

Cardiac, diuretic, emetic, purgative, vermifuge
Back to Top


Uses

A potent medicine and should be used only in the form of prepared extracts and tinctures to minimize the danger of poisoning. Large doses of the plant produce numerous and dangerous effects. It can also be taken for gout, mild dropsy, sciatica, external ulcers, intestinal worms, chronic eczema, and persistent itching skin.
Back to Top


Formulas or Dosages

Use only under medical supervision.
Back to Top


Warning

A potent medicine and should be used only in the form of prepared extracts and tinctures to minimize the danger of poisoning.

Use only under medical supervision.
Back to Top


Bibliography

Buy It! Culpeper’s Complete Herbal & English Physician: Updated With 117 Modern Herbs, by Nicholas Culpeper, Meyerbooks, publisher, PO Box 427, Glenwood, Illinois 60425, 1990, (reprint of 1814)

Buy It! The Herb Book, by John Lust, Bantam Books, 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY. copyright 1974.

Buy It! Webster’s New World Dictionary, Third College Edition, Victoria Neufeldt, Editor in Chief, New World Dictionaries: A Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc., 15 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10023

Back to Top

Share