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We are not suggesting that you ignore the help of trained medical professionals, simply that you have additional options available for treating illnesses. Often the most effective treatment involves a responsible blend of both modern and traditional treatments.

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Blood Poisoning

(Septicemia)


Contents:

Definition | Causes | Symptoms | Treatment
Herbs | Bibliography

Definition

A septic disease caused by the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxic products in the blood (sepsis, putrefaction + haimia, blood). Septic fever; systemic disease caused by the multiplication of microorganisms in the circulating blood.
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Causes

Uncleanliness, various infections, improper dressing of sores and wounds.
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Symptoms

This disease has an onset of decided chill and a feeling of depression. Shivering, followed by profuse perspiration, the pulse rate is very rapid and the area around the wound looks red and angry. The breathing grows rapid and there is an anxious expression to the face. The temperature becomes elevated and most usually a red streak in the general direction of the heart will be noted.
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Treatment

Echinacea is a very good herb to cure impure blood conditions, especially when there is a tendency to develop gangrene. Take a high enema. Take as many cups of echinacea tea a day as possible, using a tsp. to the cup; or if taken in powdered form in capsules, take two capsules every two hours.
Take nothing but fruit juices for several days, using grapefruit, orange, lemon, and pineapple in particular. Do not mix the juices. Take them one at a time but drink plenty of them. Keep the room temperature even but have plenty of fresh air. When the patient feels chilly, give a cup of hot water with a little cayenne pepper dissolved in it. Give as often as needed. One heaping tsp. of charcoal powder put in a cup with enough hot water added to make a paste, diluted, and drunk at once, is very good. Charcoal or echinacea may also be used to advantage as a poultice. Wash the wound thoroughly with boric acid solution, and if the discharge is thin and unhealthy looking, sprinkle equal parts of powdered myrrh and golden seal directly on the sore.
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Herbs
  • Bloodroot
  • Burdock
  • Charcoal
  • Chickweed
  • Echinacea
  • Elm, slippery
  • Flax seed
  • Golden seal
  • Marshmallow
  • Myrrh
  • Plantain
  • Rattleweed
  • Sassafras
  • Water pepper, (smartweed)

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Bibliography

Buy It! Back to Eden, by Jethro Kloss; Back to Eden Publishing Co., Loma Linda, CA 92354, Original copyright 1939, revised edition 1994

Buy It! Planetary Herbology, by Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992

Buy It! Indian Herbalogy of North America, by Alma R. Hutchens, Shambala Publications, Inc., Horticultural Hall, 300 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, 1973

Buy It! The Old Herb Doctor, by Joseph E. Meyer, Meyerbooks, publisher, PO Box 427, Glenwood, Illinois 60425, copyright 1984, sixth printing 1994.

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