The Medicinal Herb Info site was created to help educate visitors about the often forgotten wisdom of the old ways of treating illnesses. Many of today's drugs and medicines were originally derived from natural ingredients, combinations of plants and other items found in nature.

We are not suggesting that you ignore the help of trained medical professionals, simply that you have additional options available for treating illnesses. Often the most effective treatment involves a responsible blend of both modern and traditional treatments.

We wish you peace and health!

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Snakebites

Definition

The victim of a snake bite may exhibit mild to severe symptoms. There are many varieties of poisonous snakes and the strength of their venom differs widely. All snakebites, poisonous or non-poisonous, should be treated by a doctor immediately. Until professional help can be obtained, the patient should remain as calm and still as possible.
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Symptoms

Swelling or discoloration of the skin, racing pulse, weakness, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting may occur. In extreme cases, there will be severe pain and swelling, sometimes paralysis, unconsciousness and even death may occur. The pupils will dilate, shock, convulsions, twitching and slurred speech may occur.
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Treatment

Echinacea should be taken in tea and capsule form. Drink yellow dock tea or take 2 capsules of yellow dock every hour until symptoms are gone. The Native Americans used the fresh plant, having the victim chew the leaves and roots of the plant, swallowing the juice extracted. The pulp was made into a poultice, placed on the snakebite site after the venom has been extracted by lancing the site and sucking the venom out until blood flows freely. This was replaced frequently, no side effects have been noted, no overdose noted.

Poultices of white oak bark and leaves, comfrey, or slippery elm have been used. Plantain poultice, plantain salves, or comfrey salves are used. If you live in an area where there are rattlesnakes, eat plantain, it grows near the rattlesnake dwellings, and will supply some protection. Or if you have access to echinacea, the same applies. With minor stings or bites from bees, mosquitoes, etc., one recommended remedy is to rub the site with juice from honeysuckle vines, or herbs such as rue, chamomile, aloe vera, or plain vinegar. Keep in mind that prevention is easier than a cure.
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Nutrients

After seeing the doctor, the following suggestions may relieve pain and symptoms.

Calcium Gluconate, 500 mg. every 4-6 hrs., to relieve pain, acts as a sedative.

Pantothenic acid (B5), 500 mg. every 4 hrs. for 2 days, an anti-stress vitamin.

Vitamin C, 5,000-15,000 mg. (10,000 mg. every hour), is a powerful detoxifier. Relieves pain and discomfort and lessens infection.
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Herbs
  • Ash, white or American
  • Basil, sweet
  • Bellwort
  • Betony, wood
  • Bistort root
  • Birthroot
  • Black cohosh
  • Black-eyed susan
  • Black sanicle
  • Blazing star (liatus squarrosa)
  • Borage
  • Burdock, great
  • Catalpa, common
  • Cedron
  • Centaury
  • Cowslip (marsh-marigold)
  • Dittany, American
  • Dutchman’s-pipe
  • Echinacea
  • Eryngo
  • Fennel
  • Feverwort (coffee plant)
  • Garlic
  • Gentian root
  • Goldenrod, Canada
  • Hyssop
  • Ipecac, wild
  • Jack-in-the-pulpit
  • Jalap, wild
  • Jasmine
  • Juniper, common
  • Lily, Canada
  • Linden
  • Lobelia
  • Maidenhair fern
  • Marjoram
  • New Jersey tea
  • Pennyroyal
  • Plantain
  • Purslane
  • Pussytoes, plantain-leaved
  • Rattlesnake-master (false aloe)
  • Rattlesnake-plantain, downy
  • Rattlesnake-weed
  • Senega snakeroot
  • Skullcap
  • Snakeroot, white
  • Spurge, flowering
  • Sunflower
  • Tobacco
  • Tuliptree
  • Valerian, Greek (jacob’s ladder)
  • Virginia snakeroot
  • Water-arum (wild calla)

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Recommendations

If medical help is not available, a constricting band should be applied 4-6 inches above the site. Keep calm. Immobilize the affected site, and keep below the heart if possible. Cold therapy is not recommended. A half-inch incision should be made across the fang marks and suction should be performed until the blood flows freely. The incision should be with the long axis of the limb with a sterilized, sharp blade, just through the skin, and a suction cup should be applied for 30 minutes or with the mouth (spit out the blood and venom!).

CAUTION: Never make cuts on the head, neck or trunk.
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Suggestions

The purchase of a one-handed pump could be a good investment if you spend a lot of time outdoors. The pump is painless and can be used with poisonous insects as well as snakes. The use of the pump on poisonous insects, spiders, etc., gives extremely good results and greatly reduces reaction to the poison.
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Bibliography

Buy It! Prescription for Nutritional Healing, Fifth Edition: A Practical A-to-Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs & Food Supplements, by James F. Balch, M.D. and Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C., Avery Publishing Group, Inc., Garden City Park, NY

Buy It! Planetary Herbology, by Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992

Buy It! Back to Eden, by Jethro Kloss; Back to Eden Publishing Co., Loma Linda, CA 92354, Original copyright 1939, revised edition 1994

Buy It! The Old Herb Doctor, by Joseph E. Meyer, Meyerbooks, publisher, PO Box 427, Glenwood, Illinois 60425, copyright 1984, sixth printing 1994.

Buy It! Indian Herbalogy of North America, by Alma R. Hutchens, Shambala Publications, Inc., Horticultural Hall, 300 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, 1973

Buy It! Eastern/Central Medicinal Plants, by Steven Foster and James A. Duke., Houghton Mifflin Company, 215 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10000

Buy It! The Herb Book, by John Lust, Bantam Books, 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY. copyright 1974.

Buy It! The Rodale Herb Book: How to Use, Grow, and Buy Nature’s Miracle Plants (An Organic gardening and farming book), edited by William H. Hylton, Rodale Press, Inc. Emmaus, PA, 18049., 1974

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