The Medicinal Herb Info site was created to help educate visitors about the often forgotten wisdom of the old ways of treating illnesses. Many of today's drugs and medicines were originally derived from natural ingredients, combinations of plants and other items found in nature.

We are not suggesting that you ignore the help of trained medical professionals, simply that you have additional options available for treating illnesses. Often the most effective treatment involves a responsible blend of both modern and traditional treatments.

We wish you peace and health!

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Poor Appetite

Causes

Emotional factors such as stress, depression, and trauma may lead to a poor appetite. Controllable factors such as alcohol, cigarette, and drug use can result in poor appetite. As can an undetected illness, heavy metal poisoning, and nutritional deficiencies. To stimulate a poor appetite, the diet must be individualized to the tolerances of the patient. Undernourished people may lose their appetite at the sight of large amounts of food. So, frequent small meals are better tolerated with a gradual increase in the volume of food. Also, consider the appearance and aroma of the foods, in addition to whether the environment is conducive to eating.
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Nutrients

Multivitamin/mineral high potency complex, as directed on the label.

Vitamin A, 25,000 IU per day.

Calcium, 1,500 mg. per day.

Magnesium, 750 mg. per day.

Vitamin B complex, 100 mg. or more daily, (vitamin B or liver injections may be necessary), is a high stress vitamin that increases the appetite.

Zinc, 80 mg. per day, enhances the taste of foods.

Copper, 3 mg. per day, is needed to balance the zinc.

Brewer’s yeast, start with 1/2 tsp. and work up, is rich in nutrients, especially B-complex vitamins, and improves the appetite.

Protein supplement, taken between meals, is needed to build and repair tissue and acts as an appetite stimulant.
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Herbs
  • Alder
  • Alfalfa
  • Angelica root
  • Ash, American mountain
  • Balmony
  • Barberry, common
  • Barley sprouts
  • Beech
  • Birch
  • Blessed thistle
  • Calamus
  • Capsicum
  • Caraway
  • Catnip
  • Cayenne
  • Celery seed
  • Centaury, European
  • Ceyenne pepper
  • Chamomile
  • Columbo root
  • Devil’s-bit
  • Dill
  • Fennel seed
  • Ginger root
  • Ginseng
  • Gentian, stiff (ague weed)
  • Gold thread
  • Gotu kola
  • Hoptree (wafer ash)
  • Hyssop
  • Juniper berries
  • Knapweed
  • Lady’s mantle
  • Lemon balm, leaves
  • Magnolia bark
  • Mint
  • Mugwort
  • Mustard
  • Nettle leaves
  • Nutmeg
  • Papaya leaves
  • Peppermint leaves
  • Palmetto, saw, leaves
  • Plantain, downy rattlesnake
  • Rose hips
  • Sarsaparilla
  • Tarragon, wild or Russian
  • Thistle, blessed
  • Thistle, milk
  • Thyme
  • Valerian
  • Winter cress
  • Yarrow
  • Yellow Dock

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Recommendations

Do not drink liquids before or during meals.

Eat between meals: avocados, banana soy pudding, buttermilk, cheese, chicken or tuna, custard, fruit shakes, nuts and nut butters, turkey and yogurt. In addition to promoting weight gain, these snacks are easy to digest, are high in protein and essential fatty acids, and contain “friendly” bacteria.

Drink 3 or more cups a day of skim, soy or almond milk. Use a soy carob drink and yogurt fruit shakes. Eat only whole grain breads, rolls, macaroni, crackers, and hot and cold cereals. Use cream (soy) soups as desired. They are usually higher in protein than broth soups. Use the kinds that your system can tolerate.

Walking and/or moderate exercise can trigger appetite. Exercise if possible, but avoid strenuous exercise. Some exercise helps to assimilate nutrients better and to increase appetite.

See the doctor to rule out a physical disorder.
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Suggestions

For lack of appetite, this tea is recommended in some references:

  • Juniper berries, Balm leaves, European centaury, Nettle leaves

Mix in equal parts. Steep 1 tsp. in 1/2 cup of boiling water.

Take 1/2 to 1 cup per day, sweetened with honey, in mouthful doses.
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Bibliography

LiveStrong.com: Ginko Biloba & Appetite

Buy It! Back to Eden, by Jethro Kloss; Back to Eden Publishing Co., Loma Linda, CA 92354, Original copyright 1939, revised edition 1994

Buy It! Eastern/Central Medicinal Plants, by Steven Foster and James A. Duke., Houghton Mifflin Company, 215 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10000

Buy It! Indian Herbalogy of North America, by Alma R. Hutchens, Shambala Publications, Inc., Horticultural Hall, 300 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, 1973

Buy It! Earl Mindell’s Herb Bible, by Earl Mindell, R.Ph., Ph.D., Simon & Schuster/Fireside, Rockefeller Center 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York 10020

Buy It! The Healing Plants, by Mannfried Pahlow, Barron’s Educational Series, Inc. 250 Wireless Blvd., Hauppauge, NY 11788, 1992

Buy It! Planetary Herbology, by Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992

Buy It! The Herb Book, by John Lust, Bantam Books, 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY. copyright 1974.

Buy It! The Old Herb Doctor, by Joseph E. Meyer, Meyerbooks, publisher, PO Box 427, Glenwood, Illinois 60425, copyright 1984, sixth printing 1994.

Buy It!The Magic of Herbs, by David Conway, published by Jonathan Cape, Thirty Bedford Square, London, England. (Out of print)

Buy It! Prescription for Nutritional Healing, Fifth Edition: A Practical A-to-Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs & Food Supplements, by James F. Balch, M.D. and Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C., Avery Publishing Group, Inc., Garden City Park, NY

Buy It! The Yoga of Herbs: An Ayurvedic Guide to Herbal Medicine, by Dr. David Frawley & Dr. Vasant Lad, Lotus Press, Twin Lakes, Wisconsin, Second edition, 1988.

Buy It! The Nature Doctor: A Manual of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, by Dr. H.C.A. Vogel; Keats Publishing, Inc., 27 Pine Street (Box 876) New Canaan, CT. 06840-0876. Copyright Verlag A. Vogel, Teufen (AR) Switzerland 1952, 1991

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